100 Minories Pop-Up Museum

100 Minories Pop-Up Museum Tour

100 Minories Pop-Up Museum Tour

There are a lot of pop-ups in London, so many in fact there is a dedicated London Pop-ups website to find the most recent creations. They cover restaurants, shops and clubs, there are also art exhibitions, the most recent lists is an exhibition of ‘Breaking Bad’ character portraits that popped-up in February. However, though museums are often the location for these pop-ups, it’s not often that you see a pop-up museum.

Yesterday, I was lucky enough to go and visit one. The 100 Minories pop-up museum showcases the discoveries of an archaeological dig that took place before construction at 100 Minories, a patch of land just north of the Tower of London. The location of the dig is enough to spark my interest, but I also love the idea of a pop-up museum, and it is something that is very well suited to archaeological digs. These digs are normally temporary, they occur within a finite space within a finite amount of time and then must pack up and leave. The temporary nature of the research suits a temporary exhibition, and allows the exhibit to be close to where the action took place, something so valuable when you’re trying to imagine how the space was once used and the people that walked those streets.

100 Minories Pop Up Museum display

100 Minories Pop Up Museum display

The museum of display panels and temporary cases are kept within one of my favourite sections of the old London Wall, a space just off Cooper’s Row in a hotel car park. This isn’t directly next to the site, but the explanation boards and particularly the tour are very good for helping you get a sense of your position in relation to the site. The history presented is a wonderful example of change and adaptation in London. The oldest parts of the site date back to the London ditch, the defensive moat situated outside of the Roman and Medieval London Wall. The ditch was filled in and by the seventeenth and eighteenth century we have houses and warehouses on the site. There are hints of different land uses, with a reminder of the close accommodation between animals and people. From the Georgian period and into nineteenth century saw huge upheaval for the site as it was flattened and redeveloped, a fate that appears to be continually repeating itself following Second World War bomb damage and obviously the current construction work.

I don’t want to give too many details of the history as there is a lot for you to discover for yourself, if you have the chance, but I will mention a couple of areas I found particularly interesting. The site is an area that was on the boundaries of the Tower authority and City of London authorities, and there is a possibility the project has turned up evidence of the medieval boundary seen through methods of maintaining the London ditch. I find the subject of the Tower Liberties fascinating and not only is physical evidence of a possible medieval boundary line of interest but also the implications for administration and maintenance of the site. I wonder how much input the Tower had on the continual redevelopments of the area. As part of this, I was intrigued by something that simply featured as a sentence on a panel. The site was first flattened for redevelopment in the Georgian period and it was noted that they have yet to find evidence of a local reaction to this. What happened to the residence? Were there protests? With some much similar activity going on all over London at the moment in the name of regeneration and improved housing, it is a notable reminder how London’s landscape has been continually changing for hundreds of years, and how the voices of the displacement and removed are often lost in these stories.

There is so much scope in this project and it’s great to see so much being done with it. If you have a chance to explore the project’s 100 Minories website you can see there are plans for a work of creative writing, a digital iterative map and importantly the archaeological findings will be shared on an online Archaeological Recording Kit (ARK).

Today is the last day of the pop-up museum and I strongly urge you to pop along if you can. The museum is up from 12pm until 5pm and there are tours at 12:30pm and 3:30pm.

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